How Mindfulness Reconnected Me With Fashion

When I started my personal style blog “K on the Bay” in 2012, I snapped shots of my hometown, sunsets, and my shoes.

If I could tie in a few local brands or thrifty finds, great! As a simple Tumblr site, my vision was to show how classic style and nature go hand-in-hand. As the years went on, I became more conscious of my content. I began taking photos to get the post out quickly, ignoring my initial creative vision and love for the process.

When it was authentic for me to put on an outfit, head into work, and snap shots along Grand Traverse Bay, great! Yet once I moved to New York City, it became a chore. I started to shift my focus from creative endeavors to relationships, which also served a good purpose- for the time.

Not only did I never wear heels unless absolutely necessary, I barely wore color, either.

NYFW 2014 with Dallas and Jacey


Then, I realized I was wearing clothes to make other people happy: not me.

The brands, the designers, the ad agencies- I was leaving behind my own vision to adapt to someone else’s.

I had to take a step back and think- what clothes do I feel good in no matter what?

What do I grab first out of my closet?

Although it wasn’t organic or natural for me to snap daily outfit shots in a busy city like New York- especially when I was single with a self-timer- I still had a lot of thoughts. I started writing for my friend Ashley’s website, Kinda Kind, two months after I mysteriously hit “delete” on my blog New Year’s Eve 2016. Leaving behind four years of photos, collaborations, and memories may have been hard, but I was ready to leave behind my materialistic past and figure out what truly made me happy.

My last few months in NYC were challenging- it was pure survival mode. Trump was running for President, the #MeToo movement was a year and a half away, and my own mental health needed a serious break.

I found peace in the park and spent hours writing by the reservoir. I pondered the meaning of life, wondering if I would ever find any sort of fulfillment.

I spent the next few years writing about my journey, what makes me happy, and learned who I am as a woman- without any distractions. Being conscious of what brings me joy- not what commercials, “influencers,” or Cosmopolitan Magazine tells me- was the first step in finding inner peace.

Instead of spending Saturday morning in bed, I would get up and take a walk across the Charles River Esplanade. I began noticing the patterns in nature, the animals at the park, and the familiar faces at my Cambridge Starbucks.

As I documented my path in Boston, I realized how tied I still was to fashion- at least, the creative process.

I had a different style than the other fashion bloggers- simple photos with little to no written content- no ads or frills, and no promises of a brighter tomorrow if you buy a new lipstick shade. This didn’t make me popular. That wasn’t the point- the point was authenticity.

As I shot a photo of my new bracelet alongside my notes for the day and coffee cup, I realized how fashion, technology, AND mindfulness can merge- but not in the way you may think.

I’ve been creating my own style for some time now, a style that hasn’t changed much since I was a high school junior in a black turtleneck and gray Express mini skirt. It’s always been basic, classic, and chic- with a few added surprises.

Fashion doesn’t have to be complicated to be beautiful, and neither do our lives. My time spent away from working in fashion made me realize how what I’ve learned can add to the industry once again- and never to change the style that is mine.

When I used to work or consult for others, my soul would be crushed when they didn’t like my content. After spending hours coming up with ideas, it could be a challenge to integrate my vision with someone else’s.

As an independent person, this also made me realize- stop working with people who don’t share your vision.

Although some women on the outside may judge me for choosing a bike over a Lexus, renting a townhouse instead of having a mortgage, and choosing a cat over a husband and kids- I chose this lifestyle for a reason.

I’m free.

I am free from obsession with “things,” the need for more, and the warped view that I’m not enough.

Now, I can simply enjoy the creative process- mindfully.

The Mindful in Style inspiration board 💛

Being Grateful for What We Have- Re-Thinking Fashion After the Coronavirus

My closet at my Airbnb in Medford, 2016


When I started writing on this blog, I was beginning a journey of living more mindfully and minimally.

Trump was yet to be inaugurated, Henri Bendel still existed, and I had spent the past ten years trying to keep up with everyone around me.

It was long before J. Crew and now, Neiman Marcus, filed bankruptcy- and our society was still plagued with the need for “more.” Perhaps we still are.

As a woman who has been on a recovery voyage (I say voyage because no sea is without a few storms) since 2011, I’ve seen a lot. I’ve had everything, and I’ve had nothing.

Although I used to think “more” was the way to go, my path of fashion blogging, the lack of authenticity in influencer marketing, and my own experience working with others has lead me to one conclusion:

Quality is far superior to quantity.

Style, to me, is about doing what works for you- mindfully. I shared my thoughts about the future of fashion and how mindfulness, style, technology, and social good can merge.


I look forward to your thoughts!

My closet today, Traverse City

Dream Big: Turning Blog Posts Into A Solid Foundation

Along the path of life, people may misunderstand your journey or doubt your dreams.

When I decided to move to San Francisco in 2008, months before the stock market crashed and prior to a publicly traded Facebook, an acquaintance scoffed at me saying, “well, that will be cheap.”

Within two weeks of this comment, I got a job at a popular tech startup downtown SF and was living in a rent-controlled apartment in Laurel Heights- even less than what some friends in Metro Detroit were paying- because for me, it’s always about thinker smarter, not harder.

What would have happened if I would have taken his comment to heart?

What would have happened in the course of my life had I held back from my cross- country moves, calling off a wedding, quitting jobs I was selling my soul for, or walking away from people who didn’t value me-

all because of what someone who barely knows me had to say?

Had I not moved to SF, I never would have gotten homesick the next year and moved to Austin. I wouldn’t have met some amazing people in Texas who I’m still in touch with today, and I probably wouldn’t have decided to move back to San Francisco had I not lived such a great life the first time around.

But in 2010, I was different. I had discovered blogging, sharing my stories online, and documenting my daily activities. I realized how powerful connection is- and how you don’t have to be involved in a local community to feel a sense of home; home is wherever you feel understood. 

People doubted the San Francisco Giants that year, too. But we all know how that turned out. Fall of 2010, I drove back to the city after a work trip in Lake Tahoe, high on life after quitting an office manager job in data security. With my rental car windows down and the music on, I felt free- but I didn’t know what the rocky road of creative freedom would bring months and years into this journey.


The same person who mocked my California move asked to meet with me years later about marketing his company, as he saw my work and experience from San Francisco.

I couldn’t work with someone who once doubted me.

Over the years, I learned an important lesson the hard way: You don’t need to try to explain or justify anything to anyone when you make choices in life! Those who resonate with your path will find you- but it’s not your job to explain. 

You can simply show them.

For now, try to ignore the negative or fear-based distractions and keep aiming high- the only limitation you have is what others try to project onto you- and what you believe. ✨ You have your own foundation to build upon.


The “Dream Big, Darling” rock was created from a post I wrote back in 2017, inspired by a Primark sweatshirt and a day planner from the Harvard Coop.

Don’t Be An Actor in Your Own Life

Two years ago, after a magical and inspiring trip back to NYC, I realized working at my desk job wasn’t for me.

I went to work that Monday feeling discontent- my internal voice was telling me to create, especially after spending the day at the “Heavenly Bodies” exhibit at The Met. Full of life, beauty, and wonder, I felt more myself than I had in years- and it was apparent I needed to find a new path.

I had dinner with my landlord that evening, who told me “life is a stage, we are all actors.” Of course, the nature of our relationship made it clear he wanted me to continue with my stable job so I could afford rent- as would my father or any patriarchal figure in my life- yet my sacral authority was screaming, “create!

I didn’t know how I would afford rent, but like always, I knew I’d find a way.


Authenticity has always been crucial in my life. If it doesn’t feel natural, it’s a challenge- which is why I stopped fashion blogging and styling items I wouldn’t actually wear back in 2016.

My heart and soul knew my creative talents were being wasted at a place that wasn’t appreciated, at a firm full of people who didn’t understand me- and I physically and mentally couldn’t produce work any longer. That’s the true 5-15 Channel in me.

Even before learning about my Human Design, I knew my intuition was strong- so for the past 12 years, my impulsive life choices were made by my sacral authority without even realizing it! The missed trains, those impulsive moves, and the gut feelings- they were all for a purpose.


So, the next day I called in to reflect. By the end of the afternoon, I had written my resignation letter.

I had no idea where my path would lead, but I knew it wasn’t at a Downtown Boston law firm.

Who had I been trying to prove? My father? My ex-boyfriend? The people I went to school with?

The only person I needed to prove anything to was myself.


I bought a sketch book and arranged all my inspiration on my bedroom floor. The following day, I quit my job after seeing a new set of angel wings by Hot Swat in Harvard Square along Church Street after taking the wrong way home. Pretty powerful.

If it weren’t for those wings I saw in Harvard Square as soon as I walked out of the unusual exit at the train station after work, I never would have called in that Tuesday.


There are many other events that happened in 2018 that inspired me to quit my job and start sketching, too.

Kate’s Spade’s death shook me- and her impact on my life was so apparent that even male friends I knew in passing over the years texted me about the news. Unaware of her battle with mental health, her passing inspired me to share the truth behind the clothes and my looks.


Had I not relapsed after my new art project didn’t manifest as soon as I wanted it to, I wouldn’t have been forced to take a pause to heal and dig deeper into my own story. Unlike summer of 2018, today I understand it’s not about the end product, but it’s about the joy in the journey.

Similar Kate Spade, I wanted to bring joy to others, but forgot to find the joy in my own life. I began being an actor once again- working jobs that weren’t aligned with my purpose, sipping alcohol again, and pretending I was “fixed” when I still had a long road ahead.

My personal struggles wouldn’t have inspired me to purge what no longer served in my closet, and my life. Through sharing who we really are- whether it’s at work or in our personal relationships- we are able to align with opportunities and people who are truly meant for us.

Sure, a colorful or shiny facade is pretty, but what happens when the colors fade? What is underneath?

Is the foundation strong like a rock, or will it float away in the breeze like a feather?


Hence, why I decided to start painting on rocks- and my three and a half years of life lessons are reflected on the messages I share throughout town.

I may not be an actor in my own life, but I have decided to write my own future- and thanks to a simple sign and a few twists and turns along my path, I gained the confidence to do so.

You never know the power of a few little golden words.


After passing the angel wings, this sign was along Church Street in Cambridge. I knew I could do anything- if I just set my mind to it and let go of distractions.


Living In the Flow- This Weekend’s Lesson, As Told By A Rock


I’ve had a blast writing in the sun over the weekend, biking throughout town, and leaving little messages in secret spots.

Earlier in the week I was feeling manic- I was finding myself roaming from one room to another, starting one project but never finishing another. I was bouncing off other people’s energy, encouragement, and feedback, and forgetting to focus on what I was doing. Even for someone who writes about living in the moment, I can lose my sense of grounding, too!

I spent the weekend on my bike, exploring the city, and snapping shots of the beauty around me. Like magic, my sense of balance was restored and I felt like I had my wings of flow once again.

At last.

I sat by the Boardman River, aligning my rocks and accessories while I gazed into the water. As the river flowed, I felt my body loosen and my spirit light up. At last, the mania had begun to pass.

I can also thank my meditation teacher, Nilcee, a wonderful soul who I met back in my NYC days. She leads a Tuesday night meditation in Astoria, but has moved over to Zoom during the pandemic. Although we met four years ago, I’ve felt her energy with me ever since- and unlike other teachers in the past, she assures me she is a guide; I already have all the power within. I may have a difficult time listening to others who tell me what to do (my sacral tells me everything I need to know), but I feel extremely empowered when I’m guided along my path- or river, if you will.

She reminds me of my natural flow and rhythm, and to tune out distractions with tuning into myself. On Friday night, I even called in to a virtual Happy Hour to chat with the Astoria friends along the Grand Traverse Bay!

Near and far, it’s wonderful to feel connection, and it’s even easier to do so when you tune into yourself and live in the flow.

I’ll be leaving these around town throughout the next week, so keep your eye out for a few little golden words in Traverse City (and soon Boston + NYC!).


You Don’t Have to Contribute to the Negative Conversations

In our lifetime, we have never seen an event such as the Coronavirus pandemic.

In my 35 years on this planet, never have I walked down city streets in the middle of a Tuesday afternoon to find everything closed with barely a person on sight. As I safely left my home to lay rocks outside of businesses and in hidden spots downtown, I stopped to think about how others are feeling.

With a smile on my face, feeling full of purpose, I paused to considered those who haven’t quite seen the light at the end of the tunnel.

My heart goes out to the restaurant owners, retailers, and businesses who have halted their daily routine to flatten the curve. That’s why I am focusing my energy on doing what I can to help- even if it’s small.

You are stronger than you realize.


I thought about what we can control in terms of our media consumption and the conversations we have with family or friends (check out a post I wrote a couple of years ago about how you’re lowering your energetic vibration without even realizing it).

What are we focusing on? Fear? Financial insecurity? Health concerns?

Many of us feel compelled to join the negative conversations and will embrace some of their fear- much of which isn’t your own.

That’s why we need to focus on the helpers, not the problem.

I read an amazing article by author Steve Pavlina, who shared his views on the importance of lightworkers in today’s society:

“The lightworker’s duty is to serve the health of the body. Lightworkers strive for a healthy, sane humanity. They’re like white blood cells fighting diseases such as cruelty, apathy, depression, disempowerment, dishonesty, and cowardice. Such diseases damage the health of the body. The #1 disease lightworkers battle is fear. Wherever there is fear in the body of humanity, lightworkers are driven to respond.”


Yesterday I chatted with a few friends who are visibly concerned about their health and safety. I am, too. However, my focus isn’t on the news and the negativity. It’s about focusing on what I can do in the now.

We all have a choice of what messages we want to send- do we want to spread the fear, or send light?

Do you want to look at the problem or the solution?

Even though we have to stay home, there is so much we can do both online and within our own homes to raise the overall vibration- and choosing what conversations you partake in is a part of this.

I am doing my best to be mindful of the energy I am putting out- and instead of fear, I have faith.

Sacral Says

It’s that feeling in your gut telling you to make that right turn.

It’s the voice urging you to stay home from the party right when you’re ready to leave, to get out of bed and start writing at 3AM, and to make that cross-country move on a whim.

You know the feeling telling you “yes” or “no,” the little “mmhmm” or “uh uh” urging you to make a big decision- a decision that doesn’t make sense to anyone but you?

That’s your sacral response– and, if you’re a Manifesting Generator (or Generator) like me, you have a sacral authority that has been guiding you whether you’ve realize it or not.

Before I learned about Human Design, I had no idea my inner guide, or intuition, had an official name, leading my every move throughout my life. Those times when I followed the crowd, listened to negative feedback, or allowed naysayers to sway my decisions were the times I ignored my inner authority: my Sacral Center.

Friends and family have often thought my decisions were irrational; crazy, even. However, my moves to San Francisco, Boston, and even home to Michigan were based on feelings in my gut that I couldn’t ignore.

People often write to me and ask how I knew when it was right for me to make that next move or to quit a job that wasn’t a good fit. Lately, I’ve told them my own experiences- but also about how it relates to my Human Design. We all have an inner authority- one that won’t lead us in the wrong direction.

During this pandemic and uncertainty, our society has been forced to slow down. It’s not comfortable for many, but it’s a gift in disguise- one we may not receive again.

It’s the gift of pause and reflection.

Not only do I recommend taking this time for self-discovery, it’s also a perfect opportunity to re-assess the life you’ve been living.

How many of your decisions were impacted by society’s expectations? What choices did you make because of what other people said? If you could stop and do something over, what would you go back and accomplish?

With idle time, we can see our lives more clearly. What is your gut telling you? If you have a blank slate in front of you, what direction do you want to go in?

When you stop and listen to your gut- or whatever your inner authority may be- it’s amazing what doors begin to open for you.

Retreat: The Time For A Collective Shift

Right now is a huge opportunity for a collective shift.

Although much of the world is in panic, I see the Coronavirus as a chance for us to grow, evolve, and come together.

This isn’t a time to worry, turn against each other, lash out, or isolate. Consuming negative media, turning to bad habits, or regressing in your personal progress isn’t a solution during this uncertain time.

I’ve been doing what I can to connect with others (in a safe, virus-free way!) for the past four years now through writing on my blog and other websites. Since a lot of what I do is online, I’m a bit frightened by how uncomfortable American society is with idle time. Sitting still and learning to embrace the moment is such a gift!

Coronavirus will result in more creation and less consumption, I hope.

The only thing you can control is yourself, the light you shine, and the energy you put out into the world. As we reflect and retreat, think about how you can spread your light in your daily life.

Whether it’s an uplifting post or helping someone in need, these little things add up collectively.